Infection Prevention and Control

Free

This course is free. Register an account to access or log in if you already have an account.

Register now

What you will learn

The module provides an overview of the key principles of infection prevention and control that should be used as part of your routine work practices to protect you and your patients from infectious diseases.

Relevance

This e-learning module aims to help prepare all health care workers to minimise risk and prevent the spread of infectious agents. The flexible learning style allows you to complete the module at your own pace.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • explain your role in assessing the risk of infection in your everyday work
  • apply risk assessment to determine what precautions should be used
  • describe the components of standard and transmission based precautions that are used in everyday duties.

About this course

Duration

The course is designed to take around 45 minutes to complete.

Certificate

On successful completion of the assessments you can download a certificate of completion.

Disclaimer

This course adheres to South Australian (SA Health) guidelines and Australian National Standards.

The principles described in the course can however be applied to any health care setting.

If you practice outside South Australia it is your responsibility to refer to the specific requirements of your local health authority.

Compliance

The course aligns with National Safety and Quality Health Service, second edition – Standard 3.

Preventing and Controlling Healthcare-Associated Infection Standard: Ticked
Australian Guidelines

Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare.

Resources

Many resources can be found at SA Health Healthcare associated infections.

Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare.

Visit Hand Hygiene Australia's website for more detailed information and resources about the National Hand Hygiene Initiative (NHHI)

www.hha.org.au

Course structure